Making time to ponder the joys of remote work.

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One day a week I dedicate time to researching and developing (R&D) my skills and understanding of the world of remote work. I really love those days. Don’t get me wrong, I love all the other elements of my professional life, but there’s something invigorating and exciting about setting time aside to focus on learning from various sources.

Today, for example:

  • I had a virtual meeting from my home office with Ayush Jain from Remote Panda;
  • enjoyed a research collaboration conversation with our son in Europe, while sipping coffee at one of my favourite cafes here in Kelowna, Canada;
  • continued reading chapters from ‘Work Together Anywhere’ by Lisette Sutherland and ‘Remote Revolution’ by John Elston (I highly recommend both);
  • attended a farewell lunch for a colleague at Okanagan School of Business where I’m a business professor;
  • set up a November virtual meeting with some of our new faculty;
  • researched resources for a winter course I am teaching on Organizational Change and Development;
  • and perhaps the most important activity of the day, took time to reflect and journal about what I’m learning from various experiences and people who continue to cross my path as I continue to examine the world of remote work. (I journal with an actual paper journal using a Lamy fountain pen…definitely slows down my thinking and helps me process more effectively)

Even though I love these days, they don’t happen by accident…I have to intentionally schedule them into my week.

So why am I sharing these details of my day? So glad you asked. Technology is wonderful and is essential for just about all the work we do, even more so when the nature of your job calls for technology to connect you with your clients, teams, managers and other key people. However, for me it’s vital that I make sure part of this R&D time is spent unplugged. I need to cut out the ‘noise’ and meditate on the learning to allow time for it to connect with what is important, what’s relevant, and if necessary, file it away for further consideration, or for the ‘interesting but not vital’ file.

As a remote, (or co-located) worker, how are you building intentional time into your schedule to learn, to cultivate your craft, and to ponder the amazing experiences you are having? You’ll never regret it.

“We bring forth our best selves when we are fully activated as human beings, not just as workers.”
The Remote Revolution by John Elston

Albufeira, Portugal…one of my favourite spots for reflection.

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