academia

Remote Research: We asked, you answered…

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While we have much analysis still to do regarding the data collected on the topic of worker competencies and contribution feedback from the perspective of remote workers, I wanted to share what remote workers told us are the 6 most critical competencies necessary for success in the remote working context.

To provide some context for this, let me reiterate what I said in the previous blog, skills speak to WHAT you do, and competencies speak to HOW you do it.

One thing to point out…you will notice that communication is not on the list…not an oversight!  In every conversation we engaged in, and the additional comments added to the survey responses, it’s clear that excellent communication is absolutely vital for success as a remote worker…especially written communication. That, along with the ability to determine the appropriate communication channels to use, AND the ability to determine and use appropriate technology to get the job done.

So, drum roll please…based on feedback from 250 plus remote workers, home based in Canada, the US and various places in Europe, the top 6 competencies identified as crucial for success as a remote worker are:

  1. Self-directed: Taking responsibility for your own decisions and effectively organizing your activities based on intrinsic motivation without pressure from others
  2. Trustworthy: able to be relied on as honest or truthful
  3. Disciplined: showing a controlled form of behavior or way of working
  4. Taking initiative: an act or strategy intended to resolve a difficulty or improve a situation; a fresh approach to something
  5. Adaptable: able to adjust to new conditions
  6. High Self-efficacy: high belief in your own capabilities to produce quality outcomes

Let’s put some skin around these competencies: while you may be an amazing web developer, writer, project manager, or ________ (you finish the sentence), without the ability to adapt, you may not have what it takes to recalibrate or adjust when faced with continuing changes to due dates and deliverables. Without being self-directed you may not have what it takes to effectively organize multiple contracts to achieve the deliverables identified. If you’re not a person who’s trustworthy, and yes, this sounds generally like a bad thing, you’re really going to struggle to make any progress in your career. This one’s important to understand, so let me take it a step further. Some of us need the accountability of people around us to continue making progress. Sometimes the weather, the surf, depression, excitement… these things can cause us to prioritize other things when we’ve committed to doing something. Trustworthiness is demonstrated by consistently doing what you say you’re going to do. For people who view commitment as restrictive, it doesn’t mean you’re not a trustworthy person, but it does mean that it’s going to be difficult for you to demonstrate it through your actions. Moving on… discipline. Discipline is the long commitment in the same direction, the doing something because it’s the right thing to do, not because you feel like it.

Wrap these competencies up with a healthy self-efficacy regarding your ability to produce a product or service that is of the highest quality…and you may just have what it takes to be successful in a smart working context. (The term ‘smart work’ coined by Abodoo.com is another word used where the focus is on choosing the best place to get the work done; i.e. home, co-working space, office, local, global…)

The story continues…watch out for more blogs as we continue to unpack the findings of the feedback you have provided.

Annalong, Ireland…my roots

Making time to ponder the joys of remote work.

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One day a week I dedicate time to researching and developing (R&D) my skills and understanding of the world of remote work. I really love those days. Don’t get me wrong, I love all the other elements of my professional life, but there’s something invigorating and exciting about setting time aside to focus on learning from various sources.

Today, for example:

  • I had a virtual meeting from my home office with Ayush Jain from Remote Panda;
  • enjoyed a research collaboration conversation with our son in Europe, while sipping coffee at one of my favourite cafes here in Kelowna, Canada;
  • continued reading chapters from ‘Work Together Anywhere’ by Lisette Sutherland and ‘Remote Revolution’ by John Elston (I highly recommend both);
  • attended a farewell lunch for a colleague at Okanagan School of Business where I’m a business professor;
  • set up a November virtual meeting with some of our new faculty;
  • researched resources for a winter course I am teaching on Organizational Change and Development;
  • and perhaps the most important activity of the day, took time to reflect and journal about what I’m learning from various experiences and people who continue to cross my path as I continue to examine the world of remote work. (I journal with an actual paper journal using a Lamy fountain pen…definitely slows down my thinking and helps me process more effectively)

Even though I love these days, they don’t happen by accident…I have to intentionally schedule them into my week.

So why am I sharing these details of my day? So glad you asked. Technology is wonderful and is essential for just about all the work we do, even more so when the nature of your job calls for technology to connect you with your clients, teams, managers and other key people. However, for me it’s vital that I make sure part of this R&D time is spent unplugged. I need to cut out the ‘noise’ and meditate on the learning to allow time for it to connect with what is important, what’s relevant, and if necessary, file it away for further consideration, or for the ‘interesting but not vital’ file.

As a remote, (or co-located) worker, how are you building intentional time into your schedule to learn, to cultivate your craft, and to ponder the amazing experiences you are having? You’ll never regret it.

“We bring forth our best selves when we are fully activated as human beings, not just as workers.”
The Remote Revolution by John Elston

Albufeira, Portugal…one of my favourite spots for reflection.

Industry ‘vs’ Academia?

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J.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis had great dialogue here.

A tension that should never exist!

Those of you who have been following my blog know that I am a business professor at Okanagan School of Business doing research on remote work. You may also know that I am a coach/consultant who focuses on all things people development, and have a clear passion for those working remotely, or managing remote teams.
From my perspective, the conversation should not be industry vs academia, but rather ‘how can industry learn from academia, and how can academia learn from industry?’ It’s a new face to the age old ‘experience vs education’…each has incredible value on its own, but when the two are combined the outcomes are incredible.

What I find frustrating is that conversations are still happening that pit one against the other. Some say that academia is where invention and innovation happens, while other feel that academia is archaic and that new thinking happens in the ‘real world’ by people actually working in the field.

I came across this article that reported those interviewed “…don’t pay much attention to the publications about fundamental discoveries by universities because they don’t trust them.” Ouch!
Another article representing the flip side states that people don’t trust scientific research when companies are involved because of the propensity for bias. Ouch again!

While I respect the opinion of these perspectives, I tend to believe the best learning lives in the coming together of both sides, each doing their part. I appreciate the sentiment expressed by Martha Crago, VP of Research and Innovation at McGill University.

In addition, like any good partnership, industrial research partnerships need to be based on recognizing the value of the partnership, on trust, and on the ability to meet the other’s needs.

As we move through this project of learning about what makes remote workers great, I am thrilled to be collaborating with both academia and industry. Nathan Sawatzky has been working with me from day one on the research, and Rodrigo Bruno, a student at Okanagan School of Business, has recently joined as a research assistant. Both of these individuals bring immense insight from industry, and as Rodrigo digs into the academic research side of things, he is able to filter it through his own experiences and those he has worked with in remote settings.

Academia and industry collaborating for the purpose of bringing clarity and support to those working in a new era of work. I love it!

Academia meets Industry

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Earlier this week, Nathan and I had the privilege of presenting this research project at JAMK’s Global Colloquium in Jyväskylä, Finland. The focus of the event was the challenge faced by higher education regarding how to deliver and support innovative learning solutions in environments characterized by changing technology, economic condition and globalization. It was great to dialogue around this important topic with faculty from France, England, Turkey, South Africa, USA, and of course, Finland.
I believe it is important to keep asking the ‘why’ behind all the research we undertake. When we get our heads around ‘why’, only then can we move forward with more ‘how’ type questions. In a previous blog, ‘Remote Workers-what makes you great’ I touched on the ‘why’ behind this remote research… but what might the ‘how’ questions be? What design thinking type questions will open new doors of possibilities once the research findings have been gathered and analyzed?
As we posed these questions to the colloquium attendees…wonderful ideas began to emerge!

  • How might we deliver learning in innovative spaces such as we do with trades and technology?
  • How might we help students experience the life of a remote worker?
  • How might we prepare our students for the global impact of work?
  • How might we design our curriculum in such a way as to prepare for the competencies or ‘soft skills’ needed by our students to be successful in this context?
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Innovative classroom at JAMK’s Tiimiakatemia

The exciting thing is that as educators:

  • We have direct access to the workers of the future…we owe it to them to provide insights as to what they need to be successful (opportunity)
  • We are charged with preparing these young minds (responsibility)
  • We have the ability to reframe education in a way that reflects industry (ability), and,
  • Our students need to know how they can thrive in an every changing world (compulsion)

In an ever changing world, we may not be able to prepare students for the specifics of the jobs they will do, so perhaps we need to focus more on the nature of how the work will get done. I suggest this kind of rethinking around how we prepare students must be done in collaboration with industry, with the experts, with remote workers and those who fully support remote work. Which circles right back to the research regarding what are the keys to success for remote workers, and in what ways do they need to receive feedback and support.

Next blog…what we’ve learned so far from interviews with remote workers in Kelowna, Vernon, Vancouver and Helsinki.